Tag Archives: start up business

How to start a business in 10 days. 24 Oct

How to Start a Business in 10 Days

What! Start a business in 10 days?!

Yes it can be done! However, you really have to be motivated to start a business.

Follow these steps from Entrepreneur Magazine and in 10 days you can have a business running.

(Whether you quit your day job right away, is up to you.)

Here’s a rundown of the steps to start a business:

  1. Create a business plan – whether on a napkin or complex software write it down!
  2. Study the market – define your target market, do some research on them and the industry.
  3. Build your brand – it’s more than just a logo!
  4. Incorporate (make it legal) – at least create an LLC to protect yourself. (No lawyer needed)
  5. Set up a lean machine – keep costs down initially
  6. Tell everyone you’re in business and have something unique to offer – spread the word!
  7. Work the media – and not just print and broadcast.
  8. Fake it to make it – think BIG!
  9. Work on your business – focus on income generating tasks
  10. Party, thank everyone and get feedback

But even BEFORE creating a business plan, attend one of the workshops/seminars that Greater Phoenix SCORE has to offer. Click here for the schedule.

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How to Start a Business with No Money 8 Aug

How to Start a Business with No Money

By David Spindell, Certified SCORE Business Mentor

How to Start a Business with No MoneyI was born in Brooklyn, New York. My neighborhood was the slum of Brooklyn. In my school they were trying a new system of education. They were going to let the students learn at their own pace — in other words, not to follow any school curriculum. I was learning how to go from writing print to script.

We moved to a new neighborhood and a new school. The students were reading a book a week, and doing a book report. I became the dumbest student in the school. I had to work extra hard to move ahead in life. My father was a Local 3 Union electrician. So I got into the union because it was a father and son union.

Life was extra hard for me. I was saved by my business smarts. Which I want to share with you.

I was a successful electrical contractor who ran a multi-million dollar electrical company for 35 years. I’ve had a plumbing business, a bar, a bagel store, a jewelry store and a pawn shop. I am a very diversified entrepreneur.

I was very lucky to learn all bout business, from my first partner and I want to share with you what he shared with me that made me very successful ,

And show you where you can find a partner like I had. I want to teach you how you will know to find the right answers to all your business questions. I want to give you the confidence, to know that you can be successful at any business you go in to.

You are a very bright person, you can over come any obstacle. From my experience you will learn all you need to know to become successful.

I will teach you:

  • How to find a business
  • How to fund a business
  • How to run a business
  • How to start a business with very little money,even no money
  • How to go from the dumbest student to the smartest
  • How a billionaire made all his money with out paying any taxes – Legally
  • How to get a amazing partner like I did
  • How to do the right thing
  • How to continue your success

Confidence is the key to becoming a successful entrepreneur. If you have the confidence nothing can stop you. You know how to handle any situation that could come up. I want to give you the confidence. And watch you grow into the business giant you could be.

If you want to run your own business you have to look at the good:

  • You control your own destiny
  • You can make a lot of money.
  • You are respected by your peers.
  • You have full control if your life.
  • You can help others

Hopefully, you will become a very confident human being!

Sign up for David’s class on August 18, 2016, $25.

 

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Restaurant Layout and Design: Planning for Success

Restaurant layout and design for successLayout and design are major factors in your restaurant’s success. Typically allow 40 to 60% of space to the dining area, approximately 30% to the kitchen and prep area, and the remainder to storage and office space.

Make sure the kitchen allows efficient, effective food preparation and interaction between staff, safety in movement, dry and cold storage, dish washing, an area for staff’s personal items, convenient delivery zone, ease of cleaning and maintenance and proper ventilation.

Aim for a practical, useful layout, while setting the mood.

Make sure you have:

  • Seating/waiting areas, serving room, cashier area, rest rooms, bar (optional);
  • One or more areas from which you can view the entire restaurant;
  • Lighting, signs and obstacle-free traffic flow;
  • A variety of seating arrangements: 50% of customers come in pairs; 30% come alone or in groups of three; and 20% in groups of four or more; To accommodate the different groups, use
  • Tables for two that can be pushed together in areas where there is ample floor space. This gives you flexibility. Place booths for four to six people along the walls.
  • Adequate floor space – the suggested square footage requirements per chair are: 10-20 sq. ft in traditional restaurants, 10-12 in cafeterias, 7-17 in coffee shops;

Production Area

restaurant kitchen must have adequet production spaceOften inefficient–the result is a poorly organized kitchen and less than top-notch service. Keep menu production in mind as you determine space for receiving, storage, food preparation, cooking, baking, dish washing, production aisles, trash storage, employee facilities and a small office. Arrange your food production area so that everything is just a few steps away from the cook. Allow for two or more cooks to be able to work side by side during your busiest hours

  • Plan your menu early as the kitchen layout and equipment purchases depend on it. See if you can purchase used equipment or lease new to reduce initial costs.       Taste-test all the recipes repeatedly until the kitchen can achieve consistency. A good way to check the food and service is to have a private opening for family and friends.
  • Form a limited liability company or private corporation and be sure to define all key personnel responsibilities – in detail.
  • Allocate the available space considering furniture and equipment to be included. Consider efficient flow and applicable regulatory requirements.       Be specific for dining, kitchen, dish washing, prep, storage, bathrooms, administrative work areas and entrances/exits.
  • Plan the layout for the dining area in detail. Remember to balance the desire for the maximum number of seats with customer comfort, and avoid seating in high traffic lanes or stuffed into corners. Avoid locating tables in the middle of the room like little islands and consider instead having low divider walls and hanging plants to break up the space.
  • Don’t forget the graphics – from exterior signage to the look of the menus, graphic design plays an important part in the overall image to be portrayed.
  • Pay attention to the lighting design. Focus dramatic light onto the tables to highlight the food, and compliment it with glowing background light to make the interior and customers look good.
  • Decide whether to offer a full service bar as this will dramatically influence initial investment requirements. Periodically Arizona releases a limited number licenses such as Series 6, 7 and 9 liquor licenses – Series 6 is needed to operate a bar, Series 7 is needed to serve beer and wine, and Series 9 is needed to sell liquor at retail. Until recently, the only way to obtain a bar or liquor license had been to buy it from another business with prices reaching $90,000 for an existing Series 6 and up to $240,000 for a Series 9. This state intends to issue a total of 126 new licenses this year at the going market rate.
  • Define your insurance needs. Restaurants are sources of potential accidents from fires to floods to food poisoning, and hundreds of other catastrophes. The NRA is an outstanding resource for guidance on related insurance coverage requirements.
  • Select and train your staff early. Look for enthusiasm, good grooming and experience. Allow them enough time to become familiar with your concept as well as for cross training. Remember that the person greeting customers is as important as the person running the kitchen – and great service and great food is a winning combination for success.
  • Set up a restaurant oriented bookkeeping and accounting system – more on this later on. Be sure to establish control over the meal checks as there are dozens of scams that dishonest servers and cashiers, especially bartenders, can use.       In particular understand and document the entire process thoroughly, and watch the petty cash, cash drawer flow and check cashing processes. Get expert advice on how to prevent abuses.
  • Designate several trusted employees to supervise storage areas. Stress that they must check in all deliveries and audit the food inventory carefully – document these responsibilities into their job descriptions.
  • Read books and attend SCORE training seminars on managing a business. Take a class at a local university on restaurant management.
  • Finally, decide on the restaurant’s overall look. Beware of trendy, contrived designs that are short lived. Attempt to provide a warm, friendly atmosphere tailored to the customer base you are trying to attract.

Dining Area

Plan your restaurant's decor & seatingDining room design will depend on your concept. This is where you’ll make the bulk of your money, so don’t cut corners. Visit restaurants in your area and analyze the décor. Watch the diners; do they react positively to the décor? Note what works well and what doesn’t.

Calculating Seating Capacity

Note relation of costs to gross and to menu pricing which are functions of number of seats, seat turns, average cover, seasonality (caveat summer), lunch covers, dinner covers, etc.

Estimate gross by number of seats times average cover reflecting these factors:

  1. Determine desired profit—convert to percentage of sales to get sales required;
  2. Determine number of operating days—divide number of days into sales to get average daily sales;
  3. Estimate volume percentages for meal periods (breakfast, lunch, dinner);
  4. Multiply figures in step 3 by average sales per day to get dollar volume per period;
  5. Determine average check per meal period;
  6. Divide dollar volumes in step 4 by average check for the number of patrons per period;
  7. Estimate:
    1. Average seat occupation per meal period;
    2. Time per meal period;
  8. Divide time per period by average occupation to get seat turnover per period;
  9. Divide possible seat turnover into number of patrons to get number of seats required per period;
  10. Take the largest seating requirement in step 9 and add a 20% safety margin for the seating capacity.

This is part of a series: “So You Want to Open a Restaurant?” Click here for the rest of the series and other articles pertaining to the restaurant business.

If you are thinking of opening a restaurant, we’ve got mentors who have been there and done that! Click here to schedule a free mentoring session at a Phoenix location near you!

About the Author:

Roger_RobinsonRoger Robinson, PhD has been a SCORE mentor for over 16 years. His specialties include non-profits, business planning, specifically in restaurants and hospitality, recreational and arts and Entertainment verticals. Read more about Roger here. Click here to schedule a free mentoring session with Roger or another SCORE mentor.

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Today's Content Marketing 3 Nov

Video: Content Marketing for Startups

Are you using Content Marketing to promote your business? The more fresh, relevant content you produce or publish, the higher your changes of getting on the first page of Google.

In this video, Susan Su, explains how people read content online and gives some cool advice on how you can get your content seen!

  • Paid advertising isn’t what it’s made out to be. Internet users have “banner blindness”. They don’t pay attention to paid ads or banners that look like an advertisement.
  • There is no such thing as free traffic – you either pay with money or time.
  • 50% of your energy goes into creating the content and the other 50% goes into its distribution.
  • There are many types of “content”.

Any type of marketing requires a marketing plan – even so with today’s digital channels.

A SCORE mentor can help you by reviewing your marketing plan for free. Click here to schedule your appointment.

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How to Earn $10,000 a Month with your Business

How to earn $10,000 a month!Who doesn’t want to make $10,000 a month in their business! For a startup, that is a “Dream” goal not a “Realistic” goal.

This video by Derek Halpern of Social Triggers explains the difference.

Your “Dream” goal needs to be broken down into smaller, bite-sized goals that are realistic and attainable.

A SCORE mentor can help you set “SMART” goals:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Relevant
  • Time-bound

Click here to schedule a FREE mentoring session with a SCORE mentor near you!

 

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Video: Supercharge Your Sales and Marketing

Supercharge the 80/20 rule of sales and marketingWhat’s the difference between sales and marketing? Yes, there’s a difference.

Marketing is what you do to make the phone ring, the emails to come into your inbox and the people come to your website.

Sales happen when you answer the phone, reply to the email, or convert the visitor into a customer.

The two work together. Can’t have a successful business without both.

In this video from Entrepreneur Magazine, sales expert Perry Marshall explains the 80/20 rule:

  • Selling is taking a position on how a problem can be solved.
  • You need to really believe in what you sell – be passionate about your product or service.
  • You need to know what you Return on Investment (ROI) on your marketing is. Measuring what’s working and what’s not working. This applies to both paid advertising and “organic” (unpaid) marketing.
  • You need to create “raving fans”.
  • In e-commerce, get the traffic, convert the traffic into sales, then take the dollars and re-invest it in more traffic (advertising/marketing)

At Greater Phoenix SCORE, we have over 72 experienced mentors — many in sales and marketing — who can coach you for FREE! Click here to schedule an appointment.

 

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